Do not knock

Power company in court

Consumer watchdog the Australian Competition and Cosumer Commission (ACCC) is taking legal action against a power company over its door-to-door selling practices.

The ACCC is alleging that Australian Power & Gas (APG) salespeople made false or misleading representations while negotiating agreements for electricity and/or gas in Queensland, NSW and Victoria between January and October 2011.

The ACCC also alleges APG engaged in unconscionable conduct involving a consumer from a non-English speaking background with very limited English reading and writing skills. 

Company penalised for illegal sales

An electricity company has been ordered to pay penalties of over $1.5 million for illegal door-to-door selling practices.

AGL Sales Pty Ltd and AGL South Australia Pty Ltd were ordered to pay the combined penalties along with CPM Australia Pty Ltd, the marketing company used by AGL.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) took action against the businesses after reports of unscrupulous sales tactics.

Consumers have to right to ask a sales person to leave which they must do when asked, or ask for time to consider the offer.

Dodgy door-to-door salespeople

National Seniors says door-to-door marketers for electricity companies may be targeting the elderly and vulnerable, using deceptive tactics to get them to switch providers and sign contracts.

The problem has prompted calls from the Queensland Consumer Association for urgent action by the Queensland Competition Authority.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) said it was also investigating complaints about the marketing practices, as well as the conduct of some websites.

Door-to-door sales will decrease

Two major energy retailers, AGL and EnergyAustralia, have both announced that they will cease all door-to-door selling.

AGL made the move not long after EnergyAustralia’s announcement that it would stop door-to-door selling at the end of March.

Both companies said consumer complaints were the main reason why they had decided to stop the aggressive sales tactics.

National Seniors was a leader in raising awareness of pushy door-to-door sales tactics and created a "Do Not Knock" sticker for its members.

Do Not Knock a no-go

Older Australians are disappointed by a parliamentary committee recommendation to scrap the introduction of a Do Not Knock Register.

Earlier this week the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs recommended that the House of Representatives reject the Do Not Knock Register Bill.

The Do Not Knock Register would have prohibited salespeople from calling on residential and government addresses listed on the register.

Seniors call on Government to back Do Not Knock Register

Older Australians are calling on the Government to back a Do Not Knock Register which would allow the elderly to opt out of house calls from aggressive door-to-door salespeople.

In a submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Social and Legal Affairs, National Seniors argued that older Australians were seen as easy pickings by pushy door-to-door salespeople.

Watchdog targets door-to-door sales reps

Consumer watchdog the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is cracking down on shonky door-to-door salesmen and women who target vulnerable people, including older Australians.

ACCC chairman Rod Sims told a business meeting in Melbourne this week that the experiences of older Australians confronted by door-to-door sellers and exploitation of Indigenous Australians due to their geographic isolation were of particular concern.

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