Aged care

Elder abuse takes many forms

By Ian Henschke, National Seniors Chief Advocate            

Have you ever asked yourself what constitutes elder abuse? Could it be an adult daughter or son who “encourages” their aged parent to move out of their home for their “own good”, then promptly moves in themselves – or sells the property and pockets the money? 

This is now called inheritance impatience! 

Could it be an aged care facility that delivers meals and drinks but doesn’t check whether they’ve been consumed?

Survey shows most Australians not prepared for end of life

Australians are being urged to discuss their end-of-life wishes as most people fail to prepare for it.

A national survey commissioned for National Palliative Care Week (20-26 May) showed three out of four Australians had not talked to their loved ones about what would matter most to them if they were to become seriously unwell.

Liz Callaghan, of Palliative Care Australia, said the survey of 2,100 Australians found that eight in 10  believed it was important to talk to their family about their care wishes if they were to become seriously ill.

Think about a career in aged care, says minister

Young Australians are being urged to consider careers in the rapidly growing aged care sector.

Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said strong, long-term demand and the promise of new professional pathways made the sector an ideal employment choice.

“We are entering a golden age of ageing,” Mr Wyatt said.

A $5 billion increase in aged care funding over the next four years, announced in last week’s Federal Budget, would drive even more career growth across the sector, he said.

Senate inquiry launched into aged care providers' tax practices

A Senate inquiry will examine if for-profit aged care organisations are using loopholes to avoid paying or minimising tax, while cutting corners on the quality of service and value for money while receiving government subsidies.

The Senate Economics Reference Committee inquiry has released its terms of reference and will also assess whether accountability measures for taxpayer money are adequate and if their current practices meet public expectations.

The inquiry was proposed by Australian Labor Party Senator Jenny McAllister and agreed to by the Senate last week.

The highs and lows of the 'Baby Boomer budget'

This week’s Federal Budget has delivered a mixed bag of initiatives for older Australians, according to National Seniors Chief Advocate Ian Henschke.

Mr Henschke said what was promoted as a “budget for Baby Boomers” fell short of expectations, but wasn’t without some bright spots.

The National Seniors policy team has put together the following summary of the budget from the perspective of seniors.

Employment

Seniors have mixed views about aged care delivered at home

A major report by National Seniors Australia released this week found most seniors receiving aged care at home thought workers treated them with respect, met their personal care and support needs, and were well trained.

However, about 50 per cent of people qualified their positive views by saying better coordination between home care and health services was required, along with improvements to the Consumer Directed Care system.

Accentuating the positive: Consumer experiences of aged care at home

A major report by National Seniors Australia has found most seniors receiving aged care at home think workers treat them with respect, met their personal care and support needs, and were well trained. 

However, about 50 per cent of people qualified their positive views by saying that better coordination between home care and health services was required, along with improvements to the Consumer Directed Care system.

National Seniors welcomes new aged care watchdog

National Seniors Australia has welcomed the Federal Government’s announcement of a new watchdog for the aged care industry, which will serve as a one-stop shop for complaints.

Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said yesterday the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission, due to start work on 1 January 2019, was designed to promote transparency in the industry.

It follows the Carnell-Paterson review into failures at South Australia’s Oakden Older Persons Mental Health Service last year, which led to its closure.

Doctors play 'hide and seek' in aged care

Many doctors are reluctant to visit patients in residential aged care facilities (RACF) due to avoidable delays and inefficiencies, a new Australian study has found.

Most general practitioners enjoyed visiting patients in residential aged care but many patients also had complex medical needs, which presented their own sets of challenges, according to Dr Russell Pearson, a practicing GP and lead investigator of the study by the University of Wollongong.

The research also found many GPs found visiting RACFs a frustrating experience.

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