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Seniors call for hearing aid industry clean-up

National Seniors is calling on the Federal Government to take action to prevent the exploitation of older Australians by unscrupulous operators in the hearing aid industry.

Chief Advocate Ian Henschke will tell the Inquiry into the Hearing Health and Wellbeing of Australia, sitting in Brisbane tomorrow, that after two investigations of the industry in a decade, it is time to clean up problems that the ACCC has labelled scams.

Mr Henschke says one in six Australians have hearing loss, and the figure will rise to one in four by 2050.

Radio a big part of life for four in 10 Australians

Retired people and those who are still working fulltime say listening to the radio is a big part of their day.

A new Roy Morgan Research survey of employees aged 14 and over showed nearly four out of 10 Australians tuned in each day.

People working full time (41 per cent) were the most likely to be daily radio listeners, followed by retirees on 40 per cent and part-time workers on 35 per cent.

But the daily habit was less likely among those without a paid job, and for people who work in home duties.

Lose just 3kg to gain health benefits

New research shows that losing as little as three kilograms could translate into health benefits for many Australians.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) said that if all Australians cut their Body Mass Index (BMI) by just one point for a person of average height, the overall health impact of obesity would drop substantially.

Milk may hold key to understanding diseases

A new study on UHT (ultra-high temperature processed) milk may contribute to new treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type 2 diabetes.

Professor John Carver of Australian National University’s School of Chemistry said research showed two unrelated UHT milk proteins, which formed clusters called amyloid fibrils over a period of months, also caused the milk to transform from a liquid into a gel.

He said the same type of protein clusters were found in plaque deposits in cases of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Dodgy internet scam pops up

Consumer watchdog the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is warning people to watch out for dodgy internet pop-up windows claiming there are viruses or other nasty tech problems affecting their computer.

Known as remote access scams, these pop-up windows are used as a ploy to lure unsuspecting victims to call a fake support line – usually a 1800 number. The scammer will then ask for remote access to their victim’s computer to “find out what the problem is”.

Financial advisers to meet new standards

National Seniors has welcomed a new authority set up to oversee the standards and ethics of financial advisers.

Former Chief Executive of National Seniors, Michael O’Neill, is one of three directors with consumer advocacy experience who have been appointed to the Financial Adviser Standards and Ethics Authority (FASEA).

The other five directors include three with financial services experience, an ethicist and an academic.

Hearing health on inquiry agenda

The Queensland public hearing of the Inquiry into the Hearing Health and Wellbeing of Australia will be held in Brisbane next Friday, 21 April.

The Australian Parliament’s Health, Aged Care and Sport Committee will meet representatives of National Seniors to discuss the hearing support needs of older Australians.

“Seventy-four per cent of Australians over the age of 70 experience hearing loss,” Committee chair Trent Zimmerman said.

“It is therefore vital that we ensure older Australians have access to high quality hearing services from trusted providers.”

Chocolate hits sweet spot

Easter eggs have been in the shops for months so it’s not surprising new research has shown Australia’s chocolate consumption is on the rise.

Roy Morgan Research says that more people are eating bars, blocks and boxes of chocolates than they were three years ago.

In 2016, more than 68 per cent of the population, or just over 13.5 million people aged 14 and over, ate some kind of chocolate in an average four-week period. This was up from 65 per cent in 2013.

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Chocolate hits sweet spot

Easter eggs have been in the shops for months so it’s not surprising new research has shown Australia’s chocolate consumption is on the rise.

Roy Morgan Research says that more people are eating bars, blocks and boxes of chocolates than they were three years ago.

In 2016, more than 68 per cent of the population, or just over 13.5 million people aged 14 and over, ate some kind of chocolate in an average four-week period. This was up from 65 per cent in 2013.

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