National Seniors research

Once bitten twice shy: GFC concerns linger for Australian seniors

Retirement planning and investments are major considerations for Australians over 50.

The impact of the global financial crisis (GFC) still lingers ten years on, with 7 out of 10 concerned about another potential market collapse. Yet despite many expressing a “once bitten twice shy” sentiment, equity investment remains a significant part of the mix.

This report presents the key findings from the 2018 National Seniors Social Survey (NSSS) (Wave 7) on older Australians’ understanding of retirement income issues.

When all's said and done, retiring isn't easy!

Life might be all golf and relaxing by the pool in the beginning - but not if your money runs out!

National Seniors recently released research showing Australians were living longer, but many were failing to plan for it. 

Hope for the best, plan for the worst? Insights into our planning for a longer life.

Australians are enjoying among the longest life expectancies in the world, a trend which is expected to continue.
They are also being asked to do something not previously required of their parents and grandparents, namely, to save for a longer life than expected. However, there is limited availability and take-up of financial products that can assist individuals to efficiently manage the risk of outliving their savings. The growing fear that Australians’ saving behaviour is not keeping pace with increasing life expectancy is also now a major issue around the world.

Help shape the future of aged care

Aged care is a big topic at the moment and National Seniors is keen to have your input for our own research. Or you may want to take part in a government workshop and help shape the future of aged care. The details are on how to do either, or both, are below.

Tell us about your aged care experiences

National Seniors’ research team wants to hear your stories about your experiences with aged care services:

We would like you to indicate:

Older women living and working longer

Australia’s older women are living and working longer, rate their health as excellent more often than men, and are more likely to live alone, according to new research released by National Seniors Australia.

Its annual social survey, which was completed by 5,819 members, revealed that women were also more likely to downsize their homes as they aged, and to worry about outliving their savings and investments.

New online portal dispels health myths for seniors

National Seniors’ new online resource launched today aims to help older people stay healthier as they age.

The Healthy Ageing Hub links users to information on ways to deal with chronic health conditions and pathways to a healthier lifestyle, based on the latest scientific research from Australia and around the world.

Seniors more savvy about retirement income

A report by National Seniors Australia and Challenger.

The National Seniors Australia (National Seniors) study reported here was an online survey designed to collect information as part of the 2017 National Seniors Social Survey (NSSS)
(Wave 6).

It asked participants about their experiences, intentions and attitudes across a range of areas including health and social wellbeing, finance, work, and retirement.

Consumer Directed Care In Australia: Early stage analysis and future directions

A new research report from National Seniors Australia examines the introduction of Consumer Directed Care (CDC) in community care services in Australia.

The report, based on a survey of 4,267 National Seniors members, has revealed 98 per cent of its members, regardless of their age, believe choice of home care services is important, with those living on the age pension most likely to say it is ‘extremely important’.

4th Seniors Sentiment Index

The Seniors Sentiment Index is a summary measure of how older Australians (5o years and over) view different aspects of their lives.

The Index is calculated based on self-assessments of financial, health and social wellbeing and is complemented with Prospective Indices that consider how these facets are expected to be in five years time.

This report presents findings from the 4th Sentiment Index; it follows from the previous analyses of the Index in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

Featured Article