Research

Does your cat 'walk on the wild side'?

A university study is seeking cat owners in the Brisbane and Gold Coast regions who want to get the scoop on their cat’s ‘poop’ in the hope of better understanding their impact on wildlife.

Griffith University student Renee Piccolo wants cat owners to complete her online survey, which she hopes will yield greater insight into patterns of cat roaming behaviour.

These include the numbers of cats kept indoors and those free to roam 24/7, along with what animals these cats are preying on when they are outdoors.

'The Dish' hears more of the universe

It’s famous for its starring role in the Australian film, The Dish, which told how the CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales relayed live television of man's first steps on the moon in 1969 to a massive global audience.

Now new technology installed on the radio telescope has opened a wider range of radio waves from objects in space.

The $2.5 million 'bionic ear' receiver for the cosmos was designed to catch radio waves and turn them into electrical signals for astronomers to analyse.

Funding to help combat loneliness

The Federal Government is seeking the assistance of local organisations across the country to help combat loneliness and social isolation.

Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said $46.1 million in new funding to the national Community Visitors Scheme (CVS) would support local organisations recruit volunteers to provide vital friendship and companionship through regular visits to older people receiving Commonwealth-subsidised aged care services.

Report recommends tourists fly less and pay more

New Australian research has found global tourism was a growing contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and holiday makers should be prepared to fly less and pay more.

The University of Sydney study found the United States was responsible for most of tourism-generating Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) but the growing middle classes in China and India were adding to substantially to the environmental problem.

Seniors have mixed views about aged care delivered at home

A major report by National Seniors Australia released this week found most seniors receiving aged care at home thought workers treated them with respect, met their personal care and support needs, and were well trained.

However, about 50 per cent of people qualified their positive views by saying better coordination between home care and health services was required, along with improvements to the Consumer Directed Care system.

Accentuating the positive: Consumer experiences of aged care at home

A major report by National Seniors Australia has found most seniors receiving aged care at home think workers treat them with respect, met their personal care and support needs, and were well trained. 

However, about 50 per cent of people qualified their positive views by saying that better coordination between home care and health services was required, along with improvements to the Consumer Directed Care system.

Dance aids healthier ageing

Ballet dancing really is a great way to exercise without going to the gym - and it can also boost your social life, a new study shows.

Queensland Ballet and QUT (Queensland University of Technology) this week released the results of a joint project looking at the health and wellbeing benefits of ballet for older Australians.

The three-month project, incorporating 10 Ballet for Seniors classes, found participants had higher energy levels, greater flexibility, improved posture, and an enhanced sense of achievement.

Seven lifestyle factors could lead to dementia

Half of all dementia cases in Australia could be attributed to seven modifiable lifestyle factors, new research has shown.

The factors were midlife hypertension, diabetes, low educational attainment, smoking, physical inactivity, mid-life obesity, and depression, according to Professor Kaarin Anstey, chief investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) and principal Research Fellow at Neuroscience Research Australia.

New hope for stroke patients

New Australian research has found an injection of human amniotic cells can reduce brain injury and aid recovery for stroke patients.

A seven-year research project led by Professor Chris Sobey, of Melbourne’s La Trobe University, found when amnion epithelial cells (the cells lining the human amniotic sac during pregnancy and discarded after birth) were injected into a patient after suffering a stroke, its impact was less severe and recovery was significantly improved.

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